How to Approach Problems Found During Home Inspection

You have looked at numerous homes and this one seemed perfect. You have just found your dream home! Your realtor has presented your offer, it has been accepted, and now it’s time to wrap up the details, including a home inspection. You want the home inspection to…

You have looked at numerous homes and this one seemed perfect. You have just found your dream home! Your realtor has presented your offer, it has been accepted, and now it’s time to wrap up the details, including a home inspection.

You want the home inspection to verify that the house is sound. Your home inspector has gone through the home and presented the report. Unfortunately the inspection turned up a list of minor deficiencies and one or two serious deficiencies. This is not what you wanted! It can be frustrating and many buyers may have an urge to simply move on and search for another house. But what if you really like the house and neighbourhood? Consider taking a no-stones-unturned approach to be sure you make the right decision.

Ensure you have as much information as possible and really understand what the deficiencies are before you consider collapsing the deal. Ask your home inspector to explain the problem, possible implications, and any remedies he may want to suggest. You want to know if the deficiencies can be fixed, how could they be fixed, what the repairs would cost, and how long the repairs would take.

I may not be able to provide specific answers to all these questions, but I will offer guidance and recommend resources where the answers can be found. Gathering the required information may take a little time, but now you will have estimates for the costs, timelines, and how disruptive the repair process is likely to be. Talk to your realtor after combining the negotiated purchase price with the repair costs to decide if the final price is acceptable.

Everyone has different preferences and tolerances that influence their decisions. Some people are willing to deal with repairs or renovations, while others want no part of them. Only you, as the buyer, know your comfort zone. With the information you have gathered, you can make an informed decision to accept the existing contract, renegotiate, or walk away from the house.

There are no right or wrong ways to deal with unwanted information in a home inspection report. But if you want to be sure you make the right decision and need extra information, then take some time to gather it. Try to arrange enough time after the home inspection to gather extra information and to make a good decision without feeling rushed. Consider your home inspection report as an information resource that describes the home along with recommendations to guide you. If you really like the home and neighbourhood, I suggest you do not leave any stones unturned.

When you need a home inspector, you can contact Bob Hamm at 250-212-5490 to make inquiries or to arrange an inspection. I provide follow-up with free phone conversations through the process and  for as long as my clients own the inspected home.